Book ID: 28579 Memoirs of Major-General Heath. Containing Anecdotes, Details of Skirmishes, Battles, and other Military Events, During the American War. Written by Himself. AMERICAN REVOLUTION, William Heath.

An American Major-General on the American Revolution

Memoirs of Major-General Heath. Containing Anecdotes, Details of Skirmishes, Battles, and other Military Events, During the American War. Written by Himself.

Place and Imprint: Boston: Printed by I. Thomas and E. T. Andrews, 1798.
Edition: First and only edition.
Bibliographical References: ESTC W20737; Evans 33865; Sabin 61455.
Condition: Title-page with a small damp-stain in the upper margin; paper a little browned; very good copy.
Book ID: 28579

Physical Description

8vo, recent dark green cloth, original red-brown morocco spine label, gilt rules and lettering.

Comments

The memoirs a major general in the Continental Army, William Heath (1737-1814) of Roxbury, Massachusetts, who saw a great deal of action between Lexington and Concord and the conclusion of the war. Harry M. Ward writes in the DAB: "Heath was considered a solid but certainly not brilliant officer. His greatest ability lay in the area of logistics. He worked hard to obtain food supplies, and he was considered an officer who cared for his men. In his memoirs he described himself as being 'of middling stature, light complexion, very corpulent, and bald headed.'" As an officer in the Continental Army, Heath was automatically entitled to be a member of the Society of Cincinnati, but interestingly in 1793 he resigned that membership, citing that a hereditary organization of revolutionary war officers was too aristocratic (DAB).

Price: $500.00