A Philosophical Survey of Nature: In Which the Long Agitated Question Concerning Human Liberty and Necessity, Is Endeavoured to be Fully Determined from Incontestable Phaenomena. ANONYMOUS.
A Philosophical Survey of Nature: In Which the Long Agitated Question Concerning Human Liberty and Necessity, Is Endeavoured to be Fully Determined from Incontestable Phaenomena.
A Philosophical Survey of Nature: In Which the Long Agitated Question Concerning Human Liberty and Necessity, Is Endeavoured to be Fully Determined from Incontestable Phaenomena.
A Philosophical Survey of Nature: In Which the Long Agitated Question Concerning Human Liberty and Necessity, Is Endeavoured to be Fully Determined from Incontestable Phaenomena.

A Philosophical Survey of Nature: In Which the Long Agitated Question Concerning Human Liberty and Necessity, Is Endeavoured to be Fully Determined from Incontestable Phaenomena.

Publisher: London: MDCCLCIII.
Edition: First and only edition.
Bibliographical References: ESTC T99774 (BL, Cambridge, Congregational Library, National Library of Scotland, Bodleian, Huntington, Chicago, Penn, Texas-HRC, Yale, National Library of Australia).
Condition: One signature foxed; very good copy.
Book ID: 28449

Description

Small 8vo, modern marbled wrappers, printed paper spine label, untrimmed, 120 pages. Without half-title.

Comments

An interesting and unusual nonsectarian tract on natural philosophy, which examines the mechanisms of nature, animal existence and the structure of the earth as they relate to the will of man, liberty, happiness, pleasure, pain, social and political structures. The anonymous author cites John Locke, Thomas Browne, Henry Power, Anthony Collins and others, but theological texts are not referred to, and it is likely the author was a radical free-thinker, who preferred not to be known. This is supported by the intriguing inscription on the front blank, presumably to the publisher William Strahan: "To Mr. Strahan from his greatly obliged & humble servant under the Rose." There are numerous footnotes, enlightening the text with passages from the poetry of Alexander Pope, with the final lines of the essay citing the famous first lines of “An Essay on Man”: “ALL are but parts of one stupendous whole, / Whose body Nature is, and God the soul.” Manuscript correction, probably in the same hand as the inscription, to one word in the text. Book label of John Stephens inside the front wrapper.

Price: $1,500.00

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