Narrative of Two Voyages to the River Sierra Leone, During the Years 1791---2---3 . . . With a Succinct Account of the Distresses and Proceedings of that Settlement . . .Also the Present State of the Slave Trade in the West Indies, and the Improbability of its Total Abolition. WOMEN TRAVELERS, Anna Maria Falconbridge.
Narrative of Two Voyages to the River Sierra Leone, During the Years 1791---2---3 . . . With a Succinct Account of the Distresses and Proceedings of that Settlement . . .Also the Present State of the Slave Trade in the West Indies, and the Improbability of its Total Abolition.

Narrative of Two Voyages to the River Sierra Leone, During the Years 1791---2---3 . . . With a Succinct Account of the Distresses and Proceedings of that Settlement . . .Also the Present State of the Slave Trade in the West Indies, and the Improbability of its Total Abolition.

Publisher: London: Printed for L. I. Highman, 1802.
Edition: Stated "Second Edition" on the title-page, but there were editions in 1794 and 1795; this would correctly probably be the third edition.
Bibliographical References: Robinson, Wayward Women, pages 211-212; see ESTC T149493, N22260 & 180977.
Condition: Very good copy, in a utilitarian but not unattractive binding, with the number 446 gilt stamped at the foot of the spine. All the editions of Falconbridge's narrative are rare.
Book ID: 28066

Description

12mo, later blue-green half cloth, marbled paper boards, gilt lettering, untrimmed. Without the half-title or front blank.

Comments

¶ The first African travel narrative by an English woman and one of the earliest commentaries on the slave trade by a woman. In 1790 Anna Maria Falconbridge (1769-1802?) traveled with her husband, Dr. Alexander Falconbridge, to Sierra Leone to assist in the operations of the Sierra Leone Company, a private organization founded by Thomas Clarkson and other abolitionists to establish a colony for freed slaves. Her lively narrative in letters to a friend in Bristol tells of the many travails they suffered and of the disarray and poor management of the colony, which was blamed on Clarkson and her husband. In 1792 Dr. Falconbridge died suddenly of fever (or drink, it was cruelly rumored), and Anna Maria wrote that she did not regret his death. Indeed she shortly remarried, and with her new husband escaped the "white man's grave" of Sierra Leone, but in order to return to England they had to first travel aboard a slave ship to the West Indies, where she observed the slave trade and the West Indies first hand.

Sold