Memoirs of the Court of England. In Two Parts. By the Countess of Dunois, Author of the Ingenious and Diverting Letters of The Lady’s Travels into Spain. Writ during Her Residence in that Court. Now made English. To which is added, The Lady’s Pacquet of Letters, Taken from Her by a French Privateer in her Passage to Holland. Suppos’d to be Written by Several Men of Quality. Brought over from St. Malo’s by an English Officer at the last Exchange of Prisoners. MARIE-CATHERINE AULNOY.
Memoirs of the Court of England. In Two Parts. By the Countess of Dunois, Author of the Ingenious and Diverting Letters of The Lady’s Travels into Spain. Writ during Her Residence in that Court. Now made English. To which is added, The Lady’s Pacquet of Letters, Taken from Her by a French Privateer in her Passage to Holland. Suppos’d to be Written by Several Men of Quality. Brought over from St. Malo’s by an English Officer at the last Exchange of Prisoners.

Memoirs of the Court of England. In Two Parts. By the Countess of Dunois, Author of the Ingenious and Diverting Letters of The Lady’s Travels into Spain. Writ during Her Residence in that Court. Now made English. To which is added, The Lady’s Pacquet of Letters, Taken from Her by a French Privateer in her Passage to Holland. Suppos’d to be Written by Several Men of Quality. Brought over from St. Malo’s by an English Officer at the last Exchange of Prisoners.

Publisher: London: Printed and Sold by B. Bragg, 1707.
Edition: First English edition of Mémoires de la cour d'Angleterre (1695).
Bibliographical References: ESTC T77374; McBurney, English Prose Fiction 1700-1739, 28.
Condition: Edges a little rubbed; an attractive copy.
Book ID: 28312

Description

8vo, contemporary paneled calf, five raised bands.

Comments

On the success of her Spanish travel narratives, Countess d’Aulnoy “traveled” to England to chronicle the scandals of the court of Charles II. As recently as 1913 a new translation of Memoirs of the Court of England was published with footnotes, appendices and a scholarly introduction without noting the possibility that the text was likely fabricated; the Countess never traveled to England. But McBurney caught it; and ESTC further notes that The Lady’s Pacquet of Letters is attributed to the great English women author of similar “secret memoirs,” Delarivier Manley.

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