Verses on the Death of Doctor Swift. Written by Himself: Nov. 1731. JONATHAN SWIFT.

Verses on the Death of Doctor Swift. Written by Himself: Nov. 1731.

Publisher: London: Printed for C. Bathurst, 1739.
Edition: First edition.
Bibliographical References: Teerink 771; Foxon S-920; NCBEL II, 1064.
Condition: Crease in the center of the text, where it was once folded; some minor spots; very good copy.
Book ID: 27843

Description

Folio, recent quarter calf and marbled paper boards period style by Philip Dusel, black morocco label, gilt rules and lettering.

Comments

One of Swift's most enduring and entertaining poems, a satire in verse on the reaction of friends and foes upon the news of his death. "What Poet would not mourn to see / His Brother write as well as he? / But rather than they should excel, / He'd wish his Rivals all in Hell." He writes about Pope ("In Pope I cannot read a line, / But with a Sigh wish it mine; / When he can in one Couplet fix, / More sense, than I can do in six."), Gay, Cibber, Bolingbroke and others. Alas, the manuscript that Swift entrusted for publication was considered too offensive and numerous lines were excised and altered. Not until the Dublin edition was published later the same year was the original version published.

Price: $800.00

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